桜 ~ Sakura, a Gate to Your Sensational Memories ~

 

While I was organizing my room, I found some pictures.
In these pictures, there are preteen kinds smiling, giggling ,or acting silly.
The phrase from the movie 'Stand by Me' represents them well: "I never had any friends later on like the ones I had when I was twelve. Jesus, does anyone?"
And behind them there are sakura trees in full bloom.

 

桜 (Sakura) is well known for its beautiful blossoms.
But why do Japanese people adore it so much?

 

When it comes to March ,when its potential season of bloom, mass media reports sakura-zensen ( a chart on a map of Japan which shows prediction of sakura bloom)
everyday, and the public check them day after day.
It's because the bloom only last for a week, and you have to cherish the limited time.
The fragility represents Japanese aesthetics, and people are in touch with that throughout their lives.

 

People gather under sakura trees and enjoy parties during its bloom. It's called お花見 (ohanami). Physical year starts in April and end in March in Japan, which is the same time as sakura blooms. It's good chances to associate with new people, and is so as to have farewells.

 

Everyone has good memories with sakura blossom, but at the same time remembers back some heartaches as well.
If you live in Japan,every spring, you remember people, friends or a person who saw it with you.
Perhaps these magical blossoms absorb a part of your heart, and you are urged to see it occasionally in spite of  the fact that the falling petals remind you of complicated feelings...

 

It's only been 4 months since that season.
I already miss it so badly.
At the end of the day, it is a part of my memory, as well as my pride...

 

 

f:id:s-mic:20170813112900j:plain

 

 

.............................................................................................................................................

 

 

部屋の整理をしていた時、写真を見つけた。
12歳くらいの子供たちが、笑顔を浮かべていたり、くすくす笑っていたり、一人は変なポーズを決めていた。
映画『スタンド・バイ・ミー』に出てくる「12歳の頃にいたような友達は、その後できることは無かった。あー、みんな同じではなかろうか。」という言葉は彼らをよく表している。
彼らの後ろの桜は満開だった。

 

「桜」はその綺麗な花でよく知られている。
しかし、なぜ日本人はこんなにも桜を愛して止まないのだろうか。

 

桜の開花時期の3月になると、メディアは桜前線(日本地図に桜の開花予想を表したもの)を毎日発表し、国民はそれを来る日も来る日も確かめる。
それはなぜなら、桜の盛りは1週間しかなく、その限られた時間を大切にしなければいけないからだ。
その「儚さ」は日本の美学を表し、人々は自らの人生と重ね合わせて共感する。

 

人々は桜の木の下で集まり、パーティーを開く。これを「お花見」という。
日本の会計年度は4月に始まり、3月に終る。これは桜の時期と重なる。
新しく出会う人と交流するのに良い機会であり、お別れの時でもある。

 

全ての人は桜との良い思い出があるが、同時に心を痛める過去も思い出す。
日本に住んでいれば、毎春、桜を一緒に見た人たち、友人や特定の人を思い出す。
もしかしたら、不思議な桜の花はあなたの心の一部を奪い、あなたは複雑な気持を思い出すにも関わらず、それを見に行かずにはいられなくなるのかもしれない。

 

桜のシーズンからたった4ヶ月しか経っていない。
にも関わらず、私は既にそれを強く恋しく思う。
結局のところ、桜は私の記憶の一部であり、誇りでもあるのだ。

 

 

 

 

 

 

判子 ~ a Stamp of Your Identity ~

" What did you just say!? " I burst into laughter.
" I didn't know it was that important !" my Chinese friend cried over the phone.
Oh yeah...of course she didn't know just a stamp could be such an important thing here in Japan, and she lost her important hanko.

 

An 判子 ( hanko or 'stamp' ) of your name is essential thing in here.
Everyone has at least a few, because these are your signature or can be your identification.
An individual basically has four types of stamps of his/her family name.

 

①One is called シャチハタ ( syachihata ). It has a cap on which curved chracters are printed, and once you take off the cap, you just need to press on a piece of paper because it has buit-in supply of red ink. We use this kind as a signature for when we receive deliveries or for others relatively unimportant. In some cases, this kind of stamp can't be used because it's too casual.

 

三文判 (sanmonban) is a cheap stamp ,and we often use it as a  認印(mitomein) .
A mitomein is a stamp which is not officially registered. You can buy them in a stationary store or even in a 100 yen shop if your name is not too unique. We use it in business or for signing a contract. It is less valuable than 実印 (jitsuin). But it shows your responsibility.

 

③銀行印 (ginkouin) is a stamp registered banks where you have accounts.
Don't lose it ,or forget which one you registered in where. It is an identification of you.
If you lose it, it takes a while ( around two weeks to a month ) to change it, and during this time what you can do with your accounts is limited. You can't show this stamp to others, for your accounts' security.

 

④実印 (jitsuin) is the most valuable stamp, though its use is limited. This is an official stamp, and registered with a government office. Most people order this stamp specially, and don't show this one to others. It is used as an identification / signature but is of limited use for purchasing or selling a property, dividing your family's estate when a family member passed away and the like.

 

Don't underestimate the power of a 'stamp' when you are in here.
We even have more kinds of hanko especially in the business scene...

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

 

「え? 今何て言った!?」私は思わず大声で笑ってしまった。
「だって、そんなに大事なものだって知らなかったんだもん。」と中国人の友人は大きな声で嘆いた。
もちろん、彼女には日本では判子がそんなに大事な物だったとは知る由もない。そのため、大切な判子を無くしてしまったのだ。

 

名前の判子は、日本では欠かせないものだ。
全ての人は少なくとも、2・3の判子を持っている。それらは、身分証明であり、サインなのだ。個人では普通、苗字で4つのタイプの判子を持っている。

 

①まずは「シャチハタ」、これは文字のとこにキャップが付いていて、外せば紙に押すだけで使用できる。なぜなら、朱色のインクが本体に備え付けられているためだ。この種類のものは、宅配便の受取や比較的重要度の低いもののサインとして使われる。略式のものであるために使用できない場合もある。

 

②「三文判」は安いもので「認印」としてよく使用される。「認印」とは公的に登録されていない判子のことだ。名前があまりに珍しすぎなければ、文房具屋さんや100円ショップでも買うことができる。三文判はビジネスや契約の署名として使用される。実印程の価値は無いが、あなたに責任があることを示す。

 

③「銀行印」は取引のある銀行に登録する判子だ。これを無くしたり、どの判子をどこの銀行に登録したか忘れてはいけない。これはあなたの身分証明なのだ。もし無くしてしまったら、変更には時間がかかる(おおよそ2週間から1か月)。その間、あなたにできる取引は限られてしまう。口座のセキュリティーのために、この判子を他の人には見せてはいない。

 

④「実印」は最も重要な判子だ。しかし、用途は限られる。これは公的な判子で役所に登録してあるものだ。ほとんどの人はこれを特注し、他の人に見せはしない。これは身分証明であり、サインなのだ。しかし、不動産売買や遺産分割等でしか使用されない。


日本にいる時は、判子の効力を侮ってはいけない。
ビジネスの場においてはさらに多くの種類の判子を使用する。

 

灯籠流し ~ The Light Completes The Obon ~

 

Everything that starts has an end.
At the end of お盆 (obon ) we hold an event called 灯籠流し ( To-ro-nagashi ).
This is to send back ancestral spirits to the other world.
灯籠 ( To-ro or 'Candle-lit lantern') is written on with a name of someone who has passed away , and is placed in the sea or the river by people who have lost the loved ones.
We also have 精霊流し ( sho-ryo-nagashi) in Nagasaki prefecture and in some others.
In this event people float boats with lit Japanese lanterns on the river or on the sea.

 

Light is great.
The sunshine lights you up even when you are bothered by things that make your heart sink during the darkest night.
The stars show you the way when things get hard.
The floating dim light of candles stays in your heart, and act as a glimmer of hope for when you are lost...

 

 

 

Related Story

お盆 ~ Waiting to Welcome You Back ~ - SAKURA DROPS

 

 

 

 

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

始まるもの全てに終わりはある。
お盆の終わりには、「灯籠流し」という行事を行う。先祖の魂を霊界へ送り返すためだ。
灯籠には故人の名前が書かれ、その愛する人を失った人達によって、海や川に浮かべられる。
精霊流し」と呼ばれるものもあり、長崎などで行われる。この行事では船に提灯を乗せ、川や海へ流す。

 

光とは偉大なものだ。
日の光は、深夜には落ち込むようなことに悩まされる時でも、元気づけてくれる。
星は、辛い時にあなたを導いてくれる。
その流れるほの暗いロウソクの光は、あなたの心に留まり、途方に暮れる時にかすかな希望の光となってくれるだろう。

 

 

 

関連記事

お盆 ~ Waiting to Welcome You Back ~ - SAKURA DROPS

 

お盆 ~ Waiting to Welcome You Back ~

 

For my biggest LOVE.
We've opened the gate to welcome you back.
Miss you...
From the bottom of my heart <3

 

 

Above was a comment on Facebook that I posted with a picture the other day.
It was for my beloved grandfather who passed away two years ago.

 

We have a time called お盆 ( obon ).
It is believed that ancestral spirits come back during this time.
Originally the period of obon was from July 13th to July 15th of the old calendar.
Today, however,  it's generally from August 13th to August 16th, though depending on  region, in our case in Tokyo, it started from July 13th.

 

The picture I posted on Facebook was for the first day.
We make an horse out of a cucumber and a cow make out of an eggplant.
It is based on the traditional saying that ancestors come on a horse running faster and leave on a cow walking slowly.
And set a fire in front of the gate of our home along with above so that the ancestors and the animals won't get lost.
During obon we have a lot of things to do: a family gathering, visiting graves of ancestors etc....and so we have summer holiday during this time.
Do the workaholic Japanese have holidays ?
Family is the most important after all.

 

What should I say, if I got a chance to see my late grandfather ?
Perhaps obon is not just an event to remember ancestors but is also for people having a hardship to comprehend the reality that they've lost loved ones.
I was thinking so by watching tightened lips of my grandmother.

 

 

 

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

 

私の最も愛する人
門をあなたを迎えるために開けしたよ。
あなたがいなくて寂しいです。
心の底から愛を込めて<3

 

上記はフェイスブックに先日写真と一緒に投稿したコメントです。
私が愛して止まなかった2年前に他界した祖父へ宛てたものです。

 

日本には、お盆という期間があります。
この時期には先祖の魂が帰ってくると信じられています。
もともと、お盆の期間は旧暦の7月13日から15日でした。今日では一般的には8月13日から8月16日ですが、地域によって異なります。私たちのいる東京の場合は7月13日からです。
フェイスブックに投稿した写真はお盆の最初の日のものです。
きゅうりで馬を作り、なすで牛を作ります。これは伝承に基づき、先祖は速く走る馬に乗ってやってきて、ゆっくり歩く牛に乗って帰るとされているためです。
家の門の前で、これらの横に火を焚きます。これは先祖と動物が迷わずに来れるようにするためです。
お盆の間にはすることがたくさんあります。例えば、家族で集まったり、お墓参りに行ったり等です。
そのため、私たちはこの時期に休みがあります。
働き中毒の日本人に休みがあるのかですって?
結局のところは家族が一番大切なんです。

 

もしも、亡き祖父にもう一度会う機会があるなら、何を言えば良いのでしょう?
もしかしたら、お盆はただ先祖を思い出すためだけの行事では無く、愛する人を失ったという現実を飲み込むことに苦労している人達のためのもの、でもあるかもしれません。
そんなことを、ぎゅっと固く結ばれた祖母の唇を見て考えました。

 

茶道 ~An Art of Green Tea Ceremony ~

 

I have a place I often recommend foreign friends visit.
It's called 八芳園 ( Happouen ), a luxury hotel in Tokyo.
It has a very beautiful Japanese garden with a Bonsai exhibition and a 茶室 ( chashitsu or 'house for the green tea ceremony').

 

茶道(sado) is the art of the green tea ceremony, and in it you experience the value of 一期一会 ( ichigo - ichie or ' treasuring every encounter assuming that everything you see  is a once in a lifetime opportunity.')
Sado is the custom of entertaining guests with green tea.
It was established during the Azuchi-Momoyama Period by a person named 千利休 ( Sen-no-Rikyu ) 

 

The person who provides green tea is called 亭主 (teishu).
Sado requires the teishu to have techniques and manners for making a cup of green tea.
The guests should have the manners to receive and drink it as well.
Sado is not just an entertainment but is also an art of exchanging thoughts and a way of life through manners.

 

You can experience the sado in Happouen, and you need to book it beforehand.
Don't forget to take your Japanese friend!
Otherwise they will entertain you at their best with little English and the elegant cup of tea.

 

 

f:id:s-mic:20170818155220j:plain

 

 

 

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

 

 

 

よく外国人の友人に勧める場所がある。
八芳園」は東京にある一流のホテルだ。
ここには、とても美しい日本庭園、盆栽の展示、そして茶室がある。

 

茶道では一期一会という価値観に出会う。

「一期一会」とは、全ての出会いは一度きりだと考え、その出会いを大切にすることである。
茶道は客人を茶でもてなすものだ。
それは、千利休によって安土桃山時代に大成された。

お茶を出す人のことを亭主と呼ぶ。
亭主には茶道のお茶をたてる技術と作法が求められる。
客人もそのお茶を受け取り、飲むための作法を心得ている方が良い。
茶道は単なる「娯楽」ではなく、作法を介して相手と考え方や生き方を通わせる芸術なのだ。

 

八芳園では前もって予約をすれば、茶道を体験することができる。
日本人の友人を連れて行って!
それが難しくても、拙い英語と上品なお茶で、彼らにできる最大限の「おもてなし」をしてくれるけれども。

 

 

f:id:s-mic:20170818160715j:plain

 

 

 

 

 

興味がある方へ、詳細はこちら

点茶・お点前 お茶室「夢庵」 || PLAN ご宴会プラン || 八芳園

 

 

そうめん ~ A Simple and Entertaining Food for Summertime ~

Bang, bang, bang...
I wake up in the morning to the high pitch sounds of hammers hitting...
It seems neighbors are building a long gutter made of split bamboo for 流しそうめん ( nagashi-soumen ).

 

そうめん ( soumen ) are very thin noodles made from wheat flour. These are sold in supermarkets as dried noodles, and they are very common food during summer.
You can cook it with no difficulty: boil them in hot water, wash and soak in cold water, drain off the water, and finally, serve along with diluted Japanese noodle dipping sauce.
The sauce can be well-seasoned by spices according to your preference.
The slippery noodles go down smoothly into your throat.

 

We have an entertaining method of eating these noodles.
It's called 流しそうめん (nagashi-soumen or 'flowing soumen')
This is one of our summer traditions.
Put soumen in water flowing along a long gutter, which is made of bamboo split into a half, and you try to catch the noodles by chopsticks and eat it while it's going down or floating in the gutter.
No need to worry about wasting the noodles. The gutter has a strainer or a pool to stop them from falling down at the end.

 

We generally don't have the gutter in family houses, but if you go to restaurants, the countryside or events for it, you can still enjoy this tradition.

 

 

 

f:id:s-mic:20170816174308j:plain

 

 

 

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

 

 

キン コン、キン コン、キン コン......
ハンマーで叩く高い音とともに、今朝は目を覚ます。
どうやら、ご近所さんが「流しそうめん台」(竹を半分に割って作られた溝状のもの)を組み立てているらしい。

 

「そうめん」は小麦粉で作られたとても細い麺である。
スーパーマーケットで乾麺として売られている、夏の間おなじみの食べ物。
そうめんの調理はとても簡単だ。
お湯で茹で、冷たい水にさらし、水を切る、そして最後に薄めた麺つゆと一緒に出す。
麺つゆは、好みに合わせて香辛料で味付けをしても良い。
そうめんは、のど越しが良い。

 

そうめんを食べるのに面白い方法がある。
それは、「流しそうめん」という。
夏の風物詩の一つだ。
竹を半分に割って作られた溝の(流しそうめん台の)流れる水に、そうめんを流し、そうめんが流れている間に、それを取り、食べようとする。
麺を無駄にしているのではないか、という心配は不要。
流しそうめん台の端にはザルもしくは落ちるのを止めるものがついている。

 

一般家庭は流しそうめん台を通常持っていない。
しかし、レストランや田舎、それ用のイベントに行けば、この夏の風物詩を堪能することができる。

 

 

 

 

 

腹切り ~ Harakiri ~

 

One day, I was in abroad with non-Japanese friends...
One of my friends jokingly asked me, " Have you ever seen harakiri?"
" Ah...yeah...my dad did it..." I answered it with a small voice and a grief-stricken face.
An awkward silence filled the air......

 

Of course I was joking!
My father is still in a very good shape, and I believe no one commits harakiri these days.腹切り( Harakiri or ' suicide by disembowelment') is also called 切腹 (Seppuku).
It was an aesthetic of the samurai and the freedom of Bushido ( the samurai spirit ).

 

For samurai warriors, nothing can be more shameful than not being able to die when they should die.
Samurai lords of provinces who lost in a war considered being beheaded by their enemies as a disgrace, so they committed harakiri before they were caught.
Also they did it in order to take their responsibility for their failure and to preserve their honor.

 

The samurai who committed harakiri had an assistant called 介錯人(Kaishakunin).
The assistant were there to cut off the samurai's head, so that the samurai didn't have to suffer for a long time after he committed harakiri.

 

By the way, why did they cut their 腹 (hara or 'stomach') with their own 刀 (katana or 'sword') ?
It's because a hara is the center of the gravitation and was their soul, and a katana was also cosidered as their soul. Therefore a harakiri was a meeting of the souls.

 

Is your honor worth dying for?
Apparently we hear a resounding "Yes" from samurai.
Well...yes...for them...

 

 

 

 

 

.............................................................................................................................................

 

 

ある日、私は日本人ではない友人達と海外にいた…
一人の友人がふざけて私に聞いてきた「腹切りって見たことある?」
「あー…えぇ…私のお父さんがやっていたわ…」と、私は暗い面持ちと小さな声で答えた。
気まずい静けさがあたり一面に広がる…

 

もちろん、私は冗談を言っていただけ!
父親はとても元気だし、現代で腹切りなんてする人はいるはずがないと思う。
「腹切り」とは、腹を切って自殺することで、切腹とも呼ばれる。
それは、侍の美学であり、武士道の自由でもあった。

 

侍にとって、死ぬべき時に死ねないことほどの恥はなかった。
大名は戦に負け、敵に首を切り落とされることを恥であると考えたため、敵に捕まる前に腹切りを行った。
また、過ちに対する責任を取るためや名誉を保つためにも行われた。

 

腹切りを行う侍には介錯人が付き添った。
彼らは、侍が腹切りを行った後、長く苦しまなくするために、首を切り落とした。

 

そもそもなぜ、彼らは「腹」を自身の「刀」で貫くのだろうか。
それは、腹は重力の中心であり、彼らにとって魂であった。
刀もまた、彼らは己の魂だと考えていた。
すなわち、切腹とは魂と魂の遭遇だったのだ。

 

名誉は死に値するだろうか。
侍ははっきりと「はい」と答えるだろう。
彼らにとっては、だけれども…